10 December 2017

The State of Agriculture in San Juan, Batangas in 1919

Image credit:  Luther Parker Collection at the National Library of the Philippines Digital Collections.
A 1919 paper written by one Beato M. Bukid1 provides a rare glimpse at the state of agriculture in the eastern Batangas town of San Juan back in 1919. This was just roughly two decades since the start of the American regime in the Philippines. Not just San Juan but most other towns of the Province of Batangas were still very much agrarian in nature. Thus, a lot of the information Bukid provided would have been true as well in many other towns of the province.

Share:

04 December 2017

Taysan: Historical and Folkloric Notes about some of its Barrios

Image credit:  Google Earth Street View.
This article is the latest in the series dedicated to folkloric and historic trivia about the barrios of Batangas. This time, we focus on those of the Municipality of Taysan.

Share:

01 December 2017

19th Century San Jose, Batangas as Described by a Spanish Historian

Church at San Jose, Batangas.  Image from the Luther Parker Collection at the National Library of the Philippines Digital Collections.
This article is the sixth of a series featuring the towns of Batangas in the late nineteenth century, as described by the Spanish Historian Manuel Sastron in his 1895 book “Batangas y Su Provincia1” (Batangas and Its Province).

Share:

30 November 2017

Ananias Diokno: the Taal-born General Recognized as the only Tagalog to lead a Military Expedition to the Visayas during the Philippine Revolution

Image credit:  L - Taal, Batangas; R - Wikipedia.
It was 1898. The Philippine Revolution was becoming the success its instigators might have hoped for probably only in their wildest dreams. The Americans had yet to reveal the darker purpose which took them across the expanse of the Pacific to these islands. Emilio Aguinaldo himself, in his memoirs1, wrote: “…triumph following triumph in quick succession, evidencing the power, resolution and ability of the inhabitants of the Philippines to rid themselves of any foreign yoke and exist as an independent State...”

Share:

22 November 2017

Lipa to Padre Garcia Bypass Road by 2018, Lipa Flyovers by 2021 among DPWH Projects

Image credit:  Screen capture from the video on the Facebook page of Congresswoman Vilma Santos-Recto.
A video released 21 October 2017 by the Facebook Page of Batangas District VI Congresswoman Vilma Santos-Recto provides details of three major Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) projects in Districts IV and VI of Batangas. These are the Lipa to Padre Garcia Diversion Road, the flyovers along J.P. Laurel National Highway in Lipa City and the Padre Garcia to STAR Tollway Diversion Road.

These projects are being undertaken, according to the video, “to boost growth potential and make full use of the vast resources of the province.”

Lipa to Padre Garcia Road
The Lipa City to Padre Garcia diversion road is being built at a cost of ₱1,247,960,000. The project is being undertaken, according to the video, as DPWH’s “response to the congestion at the Manila-Batangas Road and Lipa-Rosario Road.”

The total road length is placed at 11.346 kilometers. When completed, it is expected to reduce travel time anything from 20 to 45 minutes. The video placed the diversion road’s completion date at 2021.

However, a TV Patrol Southern Tagalog report on 22 October said that the project is already 45% completed and is expected to be opened to vehicular traffic by April 2018. The DPWH Batangas official interviewed also estimated reduction in travel time by 40 minutes to one hour.

The diversion road starts at Barangay Talisay in Lipa City and passes through Santo NiƱo, Malitlit, San Benito, San Celestino, Santo Toribio and San Francisco before ending at Barangay Bawi in Padre Garcia.

Upon completion, the road is expected to “decongest the north and south bound lanes of poblacion Lipa City” and “serve as alternate routes to Quezon, the Bicol Region and Southern Philippines.

Lipa City Flyovers
The second major project is the construction of flyover roads in Lipa City “to provide comfort for the passengers of public utility vehicles and to boost the efficiency of business related activities of Lipa.”

From the graphic rendering of the project in the video, it appears that there will be two flyovers to be constructed along J.P. Laurel National Highway. The total road length of the two flyovers is 2.87 kilometers.

The first starts in the Marauoy area and descends in the vicinity of SM City-Lipa. The second begins in the vicinity of De la Salle Lipa and descends in Tambo. Both flyovers, when completed, will likely ease congestion two of the city’s present day frequently choked roads. The project is expected to be finished by 2021 and built at a cost of ₱4,305,000,000.

Padre Garcia to STAR Tollway
The final project outlined by the video is the Padre Garcia to STAR Tollway Diversion Road. This undertaking aims “to provide shorter travel time to those trying to reach the resort destinations of Batangas while enjoying the scenic landscape beside the diversion road.”

This diversion road starts in Padre Garcia and cuts through parts of Rosario, Lipa and Ibaan to gain quicker access to the STAR Tollway. When completed, the diversion road will be a boon to travelers trying to reach not just the beaches of San Juan but also other destinations beyond.

This project is being targeted to be completed by 2023 and its construction cost is pegged at ₱830,221,700. The road’s total length is 10.7 kilometers.

A recent TV Patrol report also says that construction of a Batangas City to Bauan Diversion Road is about to commence. This project, of course, within the jurisdiction of Districts II and V of Batangas.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If you enjoyed this article, please click the Like button or share it freely on social media. It helps to pay this site's domain name and maintenance costs.




Share:

21 November 2017

12 Marriage and other Customs Observed in Calaca, Batangas in 1931

Image credit:  The Luther Parker Collection of the National Library of the Philippines Digital Collections.
A 1931 Anthropology paper entitled “Customary Laws in Calaca, Batangas1,” written by one Marcela Endaya, presumably a native of the town, offers a cultural glimpse into life in the province almost a century ago. The paper is part of the Henry Otley-Beyer Collection of the National Library of the Philippines Digital Collections.

Share:

19 November 2017

19th Century Ibaan as Described by a Spanish Historian

Image credit:  University of Michigan Digital Collections.
We continue with the series featuring each of the 22 towns of Batangas as described by the Spanish historian Manuel Sastron in his book “Batangas y su Provincia1” (Batangas and Its Province) which was published in 1895. The information contained in the book was collected in the years preceding its publication in Malabon.

Share:

16 November 2017

Tuy, Batangas: Historical and Folkloric Notes about some of its Barrios

Image credit:  Google Earth Street View.
We continue with the series on the barrios of Batangas, and this time we look at the small western Batangas town of Tuy. As with the other articles in the series, the information has been taken from the documents required of Department of Education districts around the country in 1951 by the Philippine government to reconstruct local histories after important documents were destroyed during the war. The documents are among the digital collection of the National Library of the Philippines.

Share:

14 November 2017

Know the Population of 22 Batangas Towns in 1877

Image credit:  University of Michigan Digital Collections.
An 1895 book entitled “Batangas y su Provincia1” (Batangas and its Province) paints a compelling picture of the province far from the congested place modernity has turned it into in the present day. Written by the Spanish historian Manuel Sastron, the books gives contemporary readers a vivid glimpse of an era when Batangas was lush with forests and vegetation and towns and villages were not just sparsely populated but also relatively isolated from each other.

Share:

SUBSCRIBE BY E-MAIL

SUPPORT THIS SITE

If you wish to support this site by making a donation for the maintenance costs of this site, please click the PayPal button below:

Big thanks to donors:
Glenn Amante
Timothy Guevarra
John Toomey

CONTACT LIFE SO MUNDANE

Name

Email *

Message *