29 August 2012

The Church and the RH Bill

If you know that storms will come where you live, will you build a house made of paper? The Japanese of yore certainly did; but that was because in their manner of thinking, the house could quickly be repaired with more paper after the storm had passed.

On the other hand, if you had the means, will you not wish to build a house that can withstand the storm instead?

A lot has been said in the news about Catholic clerics calling up their representatives to gently remind them that the proposed RH Bill – as the Responsible Parenthood Act has come to be known – does not necessarily run along the lines of Catholic dogma.

I would say the best way for the Church is still to consider the bill from a position of confidence because this way, it has nothing to lose. As for storms, students of History will know that these are not at all unknown to the Church.
One priest, speaking to a reporter, denied allegations that clergymen had been making those calls not at all. Indeed, he asked, do the clergy not have a right as everyone else to make their opinions known?

The cleric was right, of course. Priests have as much right as ordinary lay citizens to lobby their advocacies; and lobbying is very much part of the process of democratic governance.

On the other hand, when the Church goes to the extent of weekly sermonizing from the pulpit and in the much-publicized case of the Ateneo professors even appears to be threatening in a most medieval manner, then one begins to wonder what the Church is ultimately afraid of.

After all, it is in those times deep in the night when the lights are out and everyone else in the household is fast asleep that libidinous moments come to visit. When they do, they test the resolve of couples to stick to Catholic teachings or hurl these out into night in favour of biological gratification.

Whether the RH Bill is passed or not...

In a way, the Church is like a teacher. As every teacher knows, you can do all you can in the classroom but what the pupil ultimately does with the gift of knowledge that he has been given is entirely up to him.

And the ultimate testimonial that the teacher can receive is for the pupil to live and abide by what he has been taught thinking as he does that he has been gifted with the truth...

I am afraid that the more the clerics and the misinformed fight the RH Bill, the more they advertise that the house has been built with paper. They also risk not only formalizing the loss of political clout should the RH Bill be passed; but likewise the confirmation of the general suspicion that the Church no longer exerts influence over the marital bed.

When the storm passes and the house is wrecked, who else do you look at but those who built the house?

I would say the best way for the Church is still to consider the bill from a position of confidence because this way, it has nothing to lose. As for storms, students of History will know that these are not at all unknown to the Church.

The fact that it has been around for roughly two millennia means that the house is built with stronger materials than local clerics convey with their public declarations against one divisive bill in Congress.











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RELATED STORIES:
The RH Bill: A Simplified Version
Pajero Reminder of Human-ness

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