11 April 2013

Pakakak Campaigning

Methinks, those not from these parts will be more familiar with the word trompa, this crude loudspeaker that is easily mountable onto any moving vehicle and is, therefore, one of the advertising methods favored by those who cannot afford to get their faces into television during the infernal campaign season.

The problem with the way people do things – and not just in campaigning – is that it is always immeasurably more convenient to do things as they have been done traditionally. Thinking outside the box, that is something not many people are prepared to do.

This pakakak campaigning just happens to be one of those things that politicians and their campaign managers resort to for no other reason than it has been the way it has always been done. Has anyone of them even started to wonder about the efficacy of the method, if at all?

For one it’s incredibly annoying. For another it’s also invasive. This morning, for instance, I woke an hour earlier than I usually do because a campaign jeepney had parked nearby and some inane jingle loudly intruded upon the quiet of the morning.


Were it up to me, I would use all the money that is being wasted on pakakak campaigning to hire somebody who can design posters that can coax people to look and flyers that can persuade people to read even if they later dispose of these.
Does the politician really think he will be earning votes by rudely rousing people from slumber? Swearwords, that I guarantee he earned from me!

The purpose of campaigning is to become known and also to convince. How can this happen when the quality of the audio from these pakakaks is often poor? You cannot make out the names of the candidates; let alone the substance of the inane jingles.

In essence, because the audio is frequently poor, you do not even know who is annoying you.

The worst possible scenario is when three or four of these campaign vehicles get stuck in traffic in close proximity to each other just outside your house. The result is always noise pollution.

This scenario is not just hypothetical. Before the road widening, where I live fiestas used to be characterised by the most horrendous traffic jams. Now try imagining a few of these pakakak-laden vehicles stuck in the traffic.

And throw in a couple of musicos. As a matter of fact, I write from experience. Thank God for the road widening so that the last fiesta was nothing like what I described.

What a pity because so much time, effort and resources are wasted into what essentially is an ineffective method of advertising or campaigning. Does anyone really think that some unintelligible jingle will really win votes?

Seriously?

And these are jingles for which royalties are in most likelihood not paid to the composers.

Frankly, while tarpaulin posters become eyesores that spoil the landscape and flyers invariably end up as litter, at least these can provide intelligible information and do not inflict physical discomfort. The pakakaks do, for crying out loud!

Pun intended!

Were it up to me, I would use all the money that is being wasted on pakakak campaigning to hire somebody who can design posters that can coax people to look and flyers that can persuade people to read even if they later dispose of these.

The ones I see? Amateur. Probably designed on MS Word.

Of course, I’d see to it that the platform is clearly communicated to the voting public because that, in a democracy, is what it really should be all about.

Not unintelligible and annoying jingles.











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RELATED STORIES:
Jingles
Tarps

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